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Research

Our UC Irvine Health multiple sclerosis experts and the scientists of the university's Multiple Sclerosis Research Center (MSRC) are actively seeking the causes of this debilitating autoimmune disease, as well as new therapeutic approaches to treatment.

Researchers are exploring ways to modulate or stop neuroinflammation in MS patients and to promote the repair of damaged nerve tissue.

Michael Demetriou, MD, PhD, co-director of the UC Irvine Health Multiple Sclerosis Program, has identified multiple risk factors for MS that promote immune system hyperactivity by altering the addition of specific sugars to proteins. He is exploring whether a glucosamine-like sugar supplement can help regulate overactive immune cells that target the brain in MS patients.

Ardith M. Courtney, DO, co-director of the UC Irvine Health Multiple Sclerosis Program, is participating in a research effort to determine whether a monoclonal antibody called VAHY736 can reduce disease activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

Gaby Thuy Thai, MD, is studying methods to protect the myelin sheath covering nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord. She is a participating investigator in the GATE trial, an ongoing international study comparing the effectiveness and safety of generic glatiramer acetate (Synthon GTR) to Copaxone® in blocking cells that can damage myelin and thereby reduce the frequency of relapses in RRMS patients.

In another promising area of research, Demetriou, co-director of the MSRC, recently published a study identifying a key mechanism in understanding how immune system cells are created, selected and released into the bloodstream, which may offer insights into controlling MS and other autoimmune diseases.

Learn more about UC Irvine Health MS clinical trials ›

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949-824-8600